Literal Nazis Are Marching for White Power in the United States

I shouldn’t be writing this post; I mean it shouldn’t exist. There should be no need for me to talk about a rising movement of literal Nazis in the United States. But here we are. It’s 2017, and as I am writing this blog, there are people battling white supremacists in Virginia, on the University of Virginia Campus. A state of emergency has been declared, after violence erupted in the city of Charlottesville, VA. This includes an incident where a car seemed to intentionally drive into a crowd of people who were protesting the white supremacists, injuring many, and possibly killing at least one person (at the time of this writing, reports are conflicting, but the video is awful….I’ll be amazed if no one is at least seriously injured).

Let me start by noting that we should not equivocate here. These are people who believe in the ideals of the Nazi movement. The picture above is from this gathering, showing the Nazi salute. There are photos of people wearing Nazi symbols, or even T-shirts with Hitler quotes on them. Those are not literal Nazis are basically still Nazis. They believe in white power and in “taking the country back” from minorities. The people fighting against this group are not just as bad. They are not the other side of the same coin, unless you believe that the people who fought the Nazis in WW2 were just the other side of the same coin, too. Fighting against Nazis does not make you a Nazi. It makes you a decent human being, willing to stand up for the rights of yourself and others.

So how did we get to this point? It’s easy to point fingers at Trump, and I won’t completely refrain from doing so myself. Whether Trump is a believer in this cause or not, he definitely plays on the same fears that this movement represents—fear of the other, fear of difference, general xenophobia. I cannot tell whether Trump actually believes most of what he says, but I do know that his words have an effect on our country. They must. He is the President. When he says that Mexico is sending us rapists, he is playing on fears of immigration. When his son makes reference to a handful of Skittles filled with a few bad ones, he is asking us to consider all refugees as potential threats to our country, with no real way to distinguish them (despite the fact that our vetting is incredibly stringent). These statements play on existing fears, but they also play on fallacies of bias that are difficult to avoid.

Consider this analogy. Suppose that the first time you ever saw a dog as a child, it bit you. That was your first experience with a dog. Because dogs are so prevalent, however, you might get over that first impression. Your friends will have dogs, and you will eventually realize that most of them will not bite you. Your first impression was wrong. Now, suppose that one of your friends has a rat as a pet. Already, you might be thinking “That’s not a pet!” Well, for many people rats are great pets! But they are still pretty rare as pets, at least in the U.S. So, this might be the only one you encounter. Suppose it bites you. That will again be your first impression of this pet, but what will counter it? You may never see another pet rat again.

The same thing can happen in people who only live around others that are similar to themselves. If you live in a suburb, you might be in a neighborhood where, demographically at least, everyone is a lot like you. Maybe your suburb is filled with white, affluent people. But when you watch the news, you see persons of color. What are they doing? This will be your impression of them, most likely, because you won’t have much to counter it. For years and years, African Americans were shown in a bad light in the U.S. They were servants in films, and white actors dressed in blackface to portray stereotypes. Many were featured in racist ad campaigns.

Of course, that’s all in the past, right? Not really. The segregation of America is still happening, and what’s worse (for Nazis, not decent people) is that now there are many more groups of people that have gotten rights that they never had before. This outrages white supremacists who associate American exceptionalism with white people of European ancestry. Some of these people even become members of Congress! Others march in protests like the ones happening right now.

There were analysts that warned that Trump’s victory would be used as a signal to racist organizations that they could now come into the light, and openly say what they once only thought in secret. And here we are. This would be a good time to see how our still relatively new President will deal with the situation. Something must be done. So far, I haven’t been impressed. His first speech, which just happened a few minutes ago (as I write this), indicated the violence issues come “from all sides”, which is basically another false equivalence.

Are there examples of violence from the left? Of course, there are. This isn’t one of them, however, and I don’t recall conservatives trotting out the ‘both sides do this’ language when they were complaining about riots in Ferguson. In fact, here’s what Trump said at the time: “They’re going to riot in Ferguson no matter what”. Perhaps he believes the people of Ferguson are just inherently violent. He did not, however, point out that other people are just as violent, and he has not, yet, called the Nazis in Charlottesville ‘thugs’ as he did the people in Ferguson (and Baltimore, and Oakland….).

But maybe this open violence will finally change something; maybe as a nation we can come together to condemn literal Nazis. Is that too much to ask? LITERAL. NAZIS. Surely we can agree that they should be stopped.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *